Alcoholics Anonymous And The Steps support-groups

Alcoholics Anonymous And The Beginning


The community of Alcoholics Anonymous has been providing great support and healing for recovering alcoholics for nearly 80 years. Founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith (who both were recovering alcoholics), Alcoholics Anonymous were started as a community fellowship for recovering alcoholics to encourage them to stay sober. The two came up with what is known as the 12 Steps to guide the meetings which later gave birth to the "12 traditions" that set out the reason for the AA's existence. The 12 Steps are still followed, and many recovered alcoholics say belonging to an AA group saw them through the recovery journey.


Presently, Alcoholics Anonymous can boast of more than 2 million active members throughout the world and more than 50,000 groups nationwide.


What Happens At An AA Meeting

It is always quite challenging the first time you go for the meeting if you are not aware of what goes on there. It means stepping out of your comfort zone, visiting a room full of people you don't know who have a similar problem and just like you need help to get better. The great thing is those in the room understand you completely and feel what you are feeling. The fact that the group was started by people that were former alcoholics shows that it can really help you. Everybody who is involved in AA activity has been its attendee before, which creates a unique feeling of solidarity and mutual understanding among the addicts.


All attendees of the group will be welcomed with open arms during an AA meeting. They are encouraged to join the conversations though no one will force them. AA realises that there are people who feel uncomfortable when sharing info about private matters during their first visit. In the course of time, most of the attendees realise great healing power of the open honest debating at these meetings.


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Closed And Open Meetings

Only the people that are struggling with alcohol addiction are the ones allowed to attend the closed meetings in AA.

On the other hand, friends, spouses and family members are welcome to attend open meetings. You may choose the type of meeting you feel comfortable attending. Some people have shown a marked preference to keep their recovery segregated from the rest of their lives. However, some people recover faster when their families and friends are near them.


The Twelve Steps For AA

The 12 steps which originated from Alcoholics Anonymous are presently the standards which are applied by all addiction recovery groups. Though steps are taught to one leading to the next (linear), the members experience them as a circle of events. If a recovering user hasn't successfully passed through a given step, they can revisit it until they are okay with their efforts.

The initial step requires an alcoholic to admit that he or she has a problem and needs help to overcome the same. Making yourself a promise that you'll recovery from the addiction, accepting your mistakes and the wrongs you have done to others are some of the stages that you must go through in the process. To find out more about the 12 steps, go here.


Reasons For Not Going To AA Meetings

Some people do not want to attend the gatherings because of excuses. The resistance people have towards attending AA include

  • They do not believe these meetings will be helpful
  • They fear running into a person who knows them
  • They haven't seen their alcoholism as a problem yet

Rather than concentrate on the excuses despite having a feeling that they are enormous people who are nervous about attending a meeting should focus on the reasons why they are considering this organisation in the first place.

If you suspect that the problem exists, you're probably right. Attending a meeting may end up saving you a lifetime of pain and destruction brought about by the addiction to alcohol.


Looking For An Alcoholics Anonymous Group

The AA groups are widespread everywhere and you will definitely find one near you. There is usually a schedule of meetings for each group; it is best to join as soon as you can. You should make a decision about whether you want to attend an open or closed meeting and also choose the location you have in mind, and you will definitely find one online through our meeting finder. Call us no 0800 772 3971 we are happy to help you locate an AA group today.