Talk To Frank resources-for-family

What Is Talk To Frank?

Converse with Frank is the extensive running anti-drug movement the UK has had. But, have people quit drug abuse through this?

The drug education in the entire UK received a total turn around ten years back when the police Swat team ran into a rural kitchen somewhere in the UK. Cautions of how drugs could cause you to become disturbed and impassioned calls to say no to the menacing pushers skulking in every single playground disappeared. In came strange humour and a light, yet energetic approach.


The first advert featured a boy calling the police snatch squad on his mother because she wanted to discuss drugs with him. But the new information being passed is "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."


Frank A Pleasant Private Drug Counsel

Frank, the new identity for the National Drugs Helpline, was coined by the advertising agency Mother. It was supposed to be the symbol of a reliable older brother that younger individuals can go to for guidance regarding illegal substances. Frank is has become a household name among the young people due to the many adventure stories that came from the theme such as Pablo the drugs mule dog to a tour of the brain warehouse.


According to Justin Tindall, creative director of Leo Burnett ad agency, the most important thing is that no one could accuse frank of trying to be "down with the kids," or coming out with the wrong attire. Surprisingly, the funny imitations of the Frank videos found on YouTube are quite polite. There's also no indication that Frank is working for the government, which is unusual for a government funded campaign.

Education about drug has come a long way since Nancy Reagan and the UK cast of Grange Hill told kids to "Just Say No," which a lot of people not believe was completely counterproductive.


Most promotions in Europe now concentrate, similar to Frank, on attempting to give fair-minded data to help youngsters settle on their own choices. In places that have harsh penalties for being in possession, pictures/photos of prison cells and embarrassed parents remain common. You play, you pay. is the ad used to warn young people going for night clubbing in Singapore.

Above the Influence is a campaign that mixes jokes and warning stories that the federal government has been using in the UK for a long time; it also offers positive alternatives to drugs. In the ad, teenagers are communicated to in a manner they are familiar with, like some "stoners" being marooned on a couch. However, an amazing number of anti-drug battles far and wide still fall back on terrify strategies and specifically, the drug driven "fall into hell." One example is one of the DrugsNot4Me series in Canada that revealed how a very pretty confident woman slipped into deep-eyed wreck because of drugs.

According to studies into a United States anti-drugs campaign between 1999 and 2004, advertisements showing the undesirable effects of substance abuse can frequently urge younger people who are marginalised to experiment with substances.


Frank broke new ground and was abundantly critiqued by opposed Conservative politicians at the while for setting out to propose that drugs may offer highs in addition to lows.


One primary online promotion educated viewers "Cocaine makes you feel high and in charge."

It was not generally simple to get the balance of the message accurate. According to the then creative director of digital agency Profero, Matt Powell, who designed the ad, he was wrong in believing that a normal web user has an adequate attention span. There will be many who could not have seen the adverse effects of the drugs at the end of the animation. However, Powell says the point was to be more legitimate with youngsters about medications, keeping in mind the end goal to build up the believability of the Frank brand.

According to the Home Office, up to 67% of teenagers preferred to talk to Frank if drug advice becomes necessary. Frank helpline received 225,892 phone calls and 3,341,777 hits on the website in the period 2011-2012. For him, this shows that the campaign is very successful.

Though, like with any other anti-drug media campaign around the globe, there's no proof that Frank has stopped people to use substances.

During the decade that the Frank campaign was introduced, drug abuse figures in the UK have reduced by 9%; however, much of the decline has been attributed to a reduction in the use of cannabis as the more youth shun smoking tobacco.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a national service that offers drug education and was formed in 2003 by the Department of Health in partnership with Home Office of the British government. FRANK's vision is to equip the youth with the bold facts and knowledge about the legal and illegal use of narcotics to reduce the drug use. It has run numerous media promotions on radio and the web.


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Services

FRANK gives the accompanying services to individuals who look for data and/or advice regarding drugs

  • A website
  • A confidential telephone number, available 24 hours a day
  • Email help
  • An anonymous live chat every afternoon 2-6pm
  • Help in finding a rehab and treatment facility